Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Pluto.
#1
Let us take a moment dear brethren to contemplate and fully appreciate the unique and astounding gift bestowed on us today. 
Hallelujah and praise NASA. [Image: bowing-036.gif]

We are the only humans who have ever looked upon the countenance of Pluto.  No matter if it qualifies as a planet no longer, it has lived large in our legends and imaginations and I for one am very pleased to finally see it.

Seriously, we should take a moment to think how fortunate our generations have been, of all the million generations that have preceded us, to have had the opportunity to SEE our neighbours in this tiny patch of Universe.
That my friends, to me, is winning the lottery big time.


... I was waiting for some of you sciency types to start a thread but why not me eh?

http://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/goddard/views-of-pluto-through-the-years


I'm off to try and remember my password to the 'rocket scientist' forum, bet they're excited. [Image: happy-053.gif]
Reply
#2
Glad you started this. I considered it, but I'm aware of spreading my shit too thin.

(The geek in me objects to your mention of millions of generations before us.)

But, yeah! Cool stuff; lots of surprises; more to come for a year.

Ice! Methane! Lack of craters! Grand Canyon sized scar on one of the moons.

Pluto is very young. And full of surprises.
Reply
#3
I was referring to the generations back to the primordial soup. I'm not a creationist, I don't think of the human race as having sprung forth fully formed with no connection to all the various inputs from previous forms. Geeky enough?

... too much?
Reply
#4
Well, I still call Pluto a planet.

It's the only one named after a Disney character, and NASA still considers it a planet.

Brilliant pics!
Love is... that one person whose freshly-warm toilet seat you don't find disgusting.
Reply
#5
And about bloody time we wrapped up our recon of our own friggin' back yard then, eh?

Truly, we've just scratched the surface of that recon. We need to double our efforts.



So much to know and so little time. Smile
You can lead 'em to knowledge, but you can't make 'em think.
Reply
#6
(07-16-2015, 02:36 PM)Di Wundrin Wrote:  I was referring to the generations back to the primordial soup.  I'm not a creationist, I don't think of the human race as having sprung forth fully formed with no connection to all the various inputs from previous forms.  Geeky enough?

... too much?

no, perfect my love.

It was my bad.

There's a fun clip of Colbert and Neil Tyson discussing this event.
Tyson was involved in demoting Pluto. Colbert was a bit pissed.

yet Jupiter is larger than Earth to a greater degree than Earth is larger than Pluto.

I long for 'Goofy'. Maybe an asteroid?

I just spent a week with my 10 year old  grandson, and his uber-geeky dad, who over-sees 140 power plants around the world.

I remember the snickering over 'Your-anus'; "ass-terhoids", and the ultimate:

Lake Titi-Ca-ca.

(I have matured very poorly.)

I still can't keep a straight face when Lake Titicaca comes up.

(What were they thinking?)
Reply
#7
Pluto was the Greek god of the underworld, it had nowt to do with Disney.  Nothing cutesy about it's naming,   it refers to hell.

 Too pedantic??

No? 
It's moon Charon is named after the ferryman across the Styx.  Too much yet?
 

Pluto and/or his realm is referred to as Hades.  ... yeah,  just overdoing it now.  [Image: happy-053.gif]

But you were only kidding anyway....  

I used to read all that mythology stuff in my bored youth . Blush   ... but I watched Disney stuff too .... [Image: lol-029.png]



Quote:Pluto, in Greek religion and mythology, god of the underworld, son of Kronos and Rhea; also called Hades. After the fall of the Titans, Pluto and his brothers Zeus and Poseidon divided the universe, and Pluto was awarded everything underground. There, with Persephone as his queen, he ruled over Hades.

Quote:In Greek mythology, Charon or Kharon (/ˈkɛərɒn/ or /ˈkɛərən/; Greek Χάρων) is the ferryman of Hades who carries souls of the newly deceased across the rivers Styx and Acheron that divided the world of the living from the world of the dead.
Reply
#8
Glad you mentioned that. The Disney dog came second.

Which is why we need a Goofy.
Reply
#9
(07-16-2015, 10:56 PM)Di Wundrin Wrote:  I used to read all that mythology stuff in my bored youth . Blush  
I've always found that atheists tend to have got right into Greek and other mythology during their youth.
There must be some correlation there. Maybe it's the rational mind that accepts them as stories and sees the bible as the same but the Bubble & Squeaks are a lot more entertaining?
Love is... that one person whose freshly-warm toilet seat you don't find disgusting.
Reply
#10
Quote: Maybe it's the rational mind that accepts them as stories and sees the bible as the same but the Bubble & Squeaks are a lot more entertaining?

Hell yes.  I liked the Nordic ones best, then the Greek, then Celtic, and the Roman ones least worth the read, but still ahead of the lame Bible offerings.

Regardless of belief or not in the myths they do seem to bear some correlation to how the cultures that created them ticked. They were educational in a way history couldn't quite deliver on.

The Nordic mob didn't muck about, it was all the business of surviving the weather and taking what you couldn't make. The benefits of worshiping tactically cluey axe wielding type gods for was right for them.
The Greeks were, and still are a bit more climatically blessed and more 'theatrically inclined' with their choice of preferred deities.
The Celts were, and still largely are, off with the pixies in their choices.
And the Romans were just interested in raping the world and getting drunk.

I think we can see what kind of cultures threw up Jesus and Mo.
If I had to I'd still choose the battle-axe culture thanks, at least it was more honest.

Ummm, is that racist? [Image: happy-073.gif]
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)