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itchy
#21
There's always some people with a robust immune system and other genetic gifts that don't die of the plague.
same with dogs. some of them don't die of parvo or whatever.

Not many people die from spider bites.

http://www.venomousspiders.net/
Maybe more dogs do then we know about?
Who knows? We tend not to care what kills a stray dog.
Or a stray human.
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#22
The can die from Funnel Web spider bites, still do despite medical attention but dogs just get a bit woozy and recover.
Hard to find an evolutionary driver that would encourage them to produce venom to kill a species that wasn't around when they reached their present form. They're also confined to a fairly small region of Eastern Australia and even the Koori were only around for the last 50 or so thousand years. Just a bit of a puzzling thing to think on.
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#23
yeah, there's seems to be some venomous beasties with over-kill toxins.
Box jellies, for instance. Why would they need that much nastiness?

I reckon they just have it, and it's a coincidence that it happens to be so nasty. I guess it doesn't cost them much to have it.
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#24
Luck of the genetic draw.
You can lead 'em to knowledge, but you can't make 'em think.
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#25
(09-08-2019, 06:14 PM)stanky Wrote:  same with dogs. some of them don't die of parvo or whatever.

Seems to be a load of them dying in Norway, for reasons as yet unknown.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-49627463
Love is... that one person whose freshly-warm toilet seat you don't find disgusting.
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#26
Now that's weird!   I'm betting our quarantine people spilled their coffee over that one! 

I spilled mine over this little luverly! Confused

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-49615571

 
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