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quantum mechanics is starting to piss me off
#11
i can see that ducks might be the ideal sailboat pet...especially if you had a high likelihood of sinking. They might be able to manage.
Or, say your stuck in the doldrums; run out of food....


crap, i just had a flash back to some old sci-fi flick. Was it Journey to the center of the Earth? With Pat Boone? Not sure.
Anyway, one of the scientists on the expedition had a pet duck he brought along.
There was some ribbing from the others; suggestions about various duck recipes....


It's irksome to have so much irrelevant clutter in the brain; some of it half-baked, like the movie i almost remember that i saw as a kid.
It would be nice if we had an eraser of sorts, for our brains. Delete button.

But i guess we don't.

I wonder if there's an area of the brain where most of the useless clutter resides?
Maybe we could genetically engineer something like Alzheimer's disease, to affect specific areas of memory?

Maybe cause this thread to get back on topic?

Speaking of memory, i saw a netflix documentary a few nights ago. It was about an international memory competition that happens every year.
The contestants compete at events that show-case the prowess of their recall skills.
It's pretty fascinating stuff.

I saw a guy (in the flick) break the record for a single deck of cards.
The event gives each contestant two decks of cards; both shuffled.
The athlete must look through deck one, without changing the order, and memorize the cards.
Then, using the second deck, he/she must reorganize it to match the sequence of the first deck.
(Hopefully, you can picture the process.)

Anyway, the winner does this in 16 seconds. It's an amazing feat. Hard to imagine the human brain has such hidden capacity.
There's another card event in this memory olympics, wherein the contestant has to memorize the order of the cards in as many packs of cards they can, within an allotted time. Iirc, possibly one hour.

The record is around 132 full decks of cards. No errors.
It's pretty freaky shit.

The competition reminded me of a gymnastics meet.
All the memory giants had to compete in a variety of events, to go home with the prize.

This deals out the idiot savants, or people that have an uncanny memory, but only for phone numbers.
(Though, for sure, there could be a 'special Olympics version of this at some time.)

My takeaway from this documentary (which i'm not exactly recommending; you'd have to be fairly nerdish to like it) is this:

The contestants were fairly normal people that had decided to take on the challenge of having the biggest memory biceps in the world.
Analogous to a kid that decides to become a great juggler; body builder; runner...whatever.
It's like that.
And there are techniques they use to acquire these skills. Same like the rest of skills.

I found that part fascinating...the way they turn data into mental images of known objects; numbers become letters; letters become pictures; an emotional aspect was necessary; derived from pre-stored data banks in the brain.

That aspect is rather stunning...that the means to memorizing thousands of decimal of Pi, for instance, involves relating sections of numbers to events and objects in the 'real' world.

This boring documentary that i found fascinating also addresses the current conundrum regarding memory...in that we can now carry it in our pocket.
Why would we bother to remember a mess of phone numbers, for instance?

The doc also mentions the history of some of the techniques involved in developing huge memory muscle...and they go way back. Ancient Greece; further, even.

Scholars and speech givers of olden days had to memorize shit-loads of data, to wax eloquent on their subject; especially Holy scripture stuff.
Also true regarding old cultures that relied on oral history instead of texts.

Strangely, Mongolians are top competitors in the sport...due to their inherent (and inherited?) background in images in the way their letters worked.
Men tend to dominate the sport, which also brings up questions.
However, in the last official competition, a Mongolian woman came in second.

I see i've rambled on a bunch.
What i want to do is bring this back to QM.

And how it can be linked directly to classical physics.
As if the rules for each are actually the same.

stay tuned if you think you're nerd enough.
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#12
Not fat at all Di. Just regular kitties.
You can lead 'em to knowledge, but you can't make 'em think.
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#13
Cats and dogs are a mixed bunch about what they'll chase and kill or mess with.

Belle chased birds. She caught a few too.  But she didn't kill them, her schtick was to chew on their tail feathers.
There was a pathetic Peewit that used to walk around the garden in Singo with a chewed off tail.  
It didn't seem to be traumatised at all by the experiences, she caught it a couple of times and did it no damage at all except for it's' tail.  It used fly erratically but they don't travel far so it didn't really matter.

She must have had some fondness for it as one day she came whimpering with the "get your arse out here and come and look at this" expression,  and took me up the yard to where it was scrunched down under a bush gasping.  
I picked it up, made it comfy in a little box and she stayed by it all day til it died.   It was as old as god, no damage to it that I could see, just ran out of  sparks I think.

She took to chasing magpies then but didn't get to chew on their tails, they are a whole different bird to the rather placid peewits.  Beaks are 5 times bigger and ten times more lethal.   silly girl.

I had a cattle dog in Sydney, called very unimaginatively Blue, that chased sparrows, and caught a couple.  He would sit there looking at the little bodies wondering why they stopped playing the chasing game.  He'd have a puzzled expression about why I was ranting at him to leave the buggers alone!  I liked the sparrows, they kept the spiders down.  
Then there was 'nice' Lucy, the failed pig dog, who loved the birds to bits.  She'd lay in the grass and let them, and lizards, walk all over her.
She never chased anything at all,  she was fast enough catch things, but only ran for treats and fun, not prey.

I've seen cats ignore what they should chase but only old or fat ones, never noticed any 'Buddhists' among them.
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#14
Ever write a rather epic post, with a fair amount of detail, about the nature of memory, or whatever, and when you return to the room, the others are chit-chatting about cats?

Not even Schrodinger's?

But you're such a cool cat, that you barely notice?
Almost as though you've transcended petty feelings of begrudgement?
Like, you're on a different level, but you can still appreciate the human condition?

Ever have that happen?

In my next post, i will eek revenge by plunging into the quantum/classical interface.
Knowing that no one is likely to suffer through it gives me a certain smug pleasure.

First, i must go to my special place, with my teddy bear, and weep uncontrollably, for several minutes.

For rejuvenation.
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#15
Quote:stay tuned if you think you're nerd enough.

I didn't feel qualified so took up the cats trail instead.

But I know how you feel, happens all the time.  I just tick the ignored ones up as a 'win' and move on.
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#16
(07-02-2019, 09:48 PM)stanky Wrote:  Ever write a rather epic post, with a fair amount of detail, about the nature of memory, or whatever, and when you return to the room, the others are chit-chatting about cats?

Not even Schrodinger's?

But you're such a cool cat, that you barely notice?
Almost as though you've transcended petty feelings of begrudgement?
Like, you're on a different level, but you can still appreciate the human condition??

Ever have that happen?

In my next post, i will eek revenge by plunging into the quantum/classical interface.
Knowing that no one is likely to suffer through it gives me a certain smug pleasure.

First, i must go to my special place, with my teddy bear, and weep uncontrollably, for several minutes.

For rejuvenation.

What if the Schrodinger equation were applied to the whole shebang, the observer and the object?
Ask not what is the problem but, rather, where is the lesion.
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#17
Good point Pres.. how would the cat know if there was anyone outside the box?

(that may keep him busy for an hour or two. )
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#18
Because cats are actually supernatural beings with many super powers and....




wait.


fuck that shit.
You can lead 'em to knowledge, but you can't make 'em think.
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#19
In the book i suggested to sparky, each chapter begins with a weird statement.

One of them is "Shrodinger's cat had kittens."

I like the way the Prez thinks.
(and his taste in music and first ladies)

Where i was about to go with this thread was to describe how the micro and macro rules are actually the same. The disconnect between the QM and Newtonian realms is largely a construct of our misunderstanding.

If i'm able to explain this approach, it will require every last brain cell i have.

crap.

357 more of them died while i typed that.

And now i can't find my tape measure.
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#20
The 357 didn't die in vain Stanky, made me laugh. Thank them for their sacrifice.

Thoughts and prayers for your tape measure.
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