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Sciency question.
#11
They come in a wide range of shapes colours and sizes. One of the survivors here is a groundcover variety less than a foot high but a few meters wide, but I grew up in the shade of one about the size of the one pictured here.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grevillea_robusta

It was a pretty sight when it's yellow flowers where thickest, but after 30 years it started trying to kill us by dropping big branches for no discernible reason. Had to get it cut down because inspection revealed it was riddled with borers and the whole tree was about to fall apart.

Sad day when it came down. It had been a big part of my world for a long time. siiiiigh.
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#12
(06-05-2019, 05:44 PM)grayman Wrote:  On a positive note, I now know what a "grevillea" is.

learn something everyday. Thanks, g-man.

I was reading about a native Aussie tree the other day; name escapes me....something like "Gimbie-Gimbie"?
Horrendously toxic. Terrible pain to even brush up against the leaves.

We have plants that sting or make you itch...and a few with thorns that can go through a shoe....but nothing on that level.

It's a wonder anyone is alive down under.

I was listening to a famous Aussie naturalist/outdoor'sman/hunter the other day. He travels the world; makes films, etc. Name, unfortunately, escapes me.

He was asked to compare the Oz outback to the U.S.
His answer surprised me.

He said "Fuck America!" In twenty years of roaming the outback, he said he's encountered three venomous snakes; all subdued and polite.
On a three day hike in the U.S., he saw 18 rattlesnakes; a few tried to strike; and he was charged by a grizzly bear.

Still, there's that insane venom down under. and box-jellies. Fuck that.

and the salties. That's just crazy.

Alligators are cuddly in comparison.
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#13
(06-05-2019, 08:32 PM)stanky Wrote:  
(06-05-2019, 05:44 PM)grayman Wrote:  On a positive note, I now know what a "grevillea" is.

learn something everyday. Thanks, g-man.

I was reading about a native Aussie tree the other day; name escapes me....something like "Gimbie-Gimbie"?

 Horrendously toxic. Terrible pain to even brush up against the leaves.

Gympie Gympie or Gimpi Gimpi.  There's a town in Qld named Gympie after the bush, Grifter lives in that region, but that's pretty far south for the plants. 
Like everything in Oz it's been exaggerated.  Yes it's a pretty horrible thing to get stung by but it's hardly a "suicide plant" 
I've known people who had a brush with them and it sure didn't drive them to suicide.

My grandfather was stabbed by a Stonefish and survived that too.  But it stopped him fishing and wading barefoot in the tropics. Confused

I've seen a few of the Gympie bushes, mostly pointed out before there was a chance of wandering into one.
The trorpical tour companies kept one growing, fenced off,  near the parking area where the scenic trails started from. 
They took all the passengers over to take a good look at it,  and told them to avoid one at all costs and not to 'test' one but just take their word the result would not enhance their holiday enjoyment.  
I thought that a very good idea,  worked too,  the incidents of hospitilized stung tourists dropped to near zero.


We have plants that sting or make you itch...and a few with thorns that can go through a shoe....but nothing on that level.

You probably do, it seem that people like to exaggerate the dangers in Oz.  

It's a wonder anyone is alive down under.

I was listening to a famous Aussie naturalist/outdoor'sman/hunter the other day. He travels the world; makes films, etc. Name, unfortunately, escapes me.

He was asked to compare the Oz outback to the U.S.
His answer surprised me.

He said "Fuck America!" In twenty years of roaming the outback, he said he's encountered three venomous snakes; all subdued and polite.
On a three day hike in the U.S., he saw 18 rattlesnakes; a few tried to strike; and he was charged by a grizzly bear.

He's got it right,  we may have some more deadly critters on the venom scale, but not near as many of them, and far less likely to be encountered than in a more densely populated country. 

As said naturalist stated, it's rare to encounter anything lethal in the bush, most snake bites occur in urban areas by stressed reptiles cornered by idiots.  People die in the Oz outback of heat, cold, or thirst not from getting attacked by the wildlife.

Ocean swimming holds more dangers but only the same ones as other countries with coastlines.  ... except for the blue ringed octopus perhaps.  I think thats a one off Aussie species.  They can't even concoct an anti-venom for a nip from them.   No coming back from that if you're far from a hospital and good friends to keep you breathing until you get there. 
But they're laid back creatures, they don't come hunting people.  They just react to being messed with.  Do  Not  Touch it if it's got neon blue rings on it.   But death toll, 2 or 3.  in 200 years?  seems reasonable.


Still, there's that insane venom down under. and box-jellies. Fuck that.

and the salties. That's just crazy.

Alligators are cuddly in comparison.

There's a sad story unfolding in Far N. Queensland at the moment.  A 2 year old has vanished from the back yard and there's been a gathering force to search for him.  But home is on a huge property, cattle I think, way up on the Cape York Peninsular and they have looked everywhere he could have wandered to,  and the only option now is to drag the big 'pond' near the house where crocs have been seen in the past.   

Not much hope of that one ending happily.
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#14
Ugh, that is nasty.

Still, the rate our kids get drowned in ponds, it's nothing very new.

I always love the stories how the kid was loved so much by the parents...

...that they couldn't be bothered watching him near open water.
Love is... that one person whose freshly-warm toilet seat you don't find disgusting.
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#15
I have to agree, although from how I heard it the water is not all that close to the house. The feeling is that a croc has wandered out hunting and taken him back for dinner. A two year old would be no problem for a croc to drag.

Easier to handle if he's just drowned though really.
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#16
(06-05-2019, 08:32 PM)stanky Wrote:  I was reading about a native Aussie tree the other day; name escapes me....something like "Gimbie-Gimbie"?
Horrendously toxic. Terrible pain to even brush up against the leaves.

We have plants that sting or make you itch...and a few with thorns that can go through a shoe....but nothing on that level.

Hogweed would be a contender, though.
"This is what you get when you send your brains on holiday." - TA
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#17
I got a good touching up by a Rhus tree that was growing in our yard.  I found out the hard way that the only time to prune them is in the dead of winter as in the warmer weather the sap rises and eats bits out of you.

This bloke is a wimp, I had worse 'burns' than that and had them around the neck and  bunged up eyes for a week.
I just wacked a few layers of cortisone cream on the welts and they went away in 3 days.

The stuff gets on your fingers and wiping the sweat off my face was a really bad mistake, especially getting it around the eyes.

But they're not Aussie trees so I suppose they don't count?



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