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The Space Race
#1
Some food for thought for people who would have people travelling for decades on a space ship once we learn how to go a lot faster: https://interestingengineering.com/nasa-finds-that-dormant-viruses-activate-during-spaceflight
Love is... that one person whose freshly-warm toilet seat you don't find disgusting.
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#2
That's a chilling finding. Aside from the space faring aspects, the stressor release mechanism involved is even more important to consider.

We're a pretty complicated bioform, everything is. Makes you think "Gaia" doesn't it?
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#3
Nothing makes me feel more alienated from the human destiny and unstoppable intelligence, than how very many really intelligent people are convinced that we will eventually populate the galaxies. It's hard to find one of our geniuses that doesn't share that opinion.

I've never bought it. Not even a little. Which is evidence of my lack of intelligence.
I very seriously doubt that we'll ever manage a colony on Mars...and if we could manage it, it would be an absurdly costly endeavor with almost no conceivable rewards...other than bragging rights and emotional idiocy.

Even the plan to mine asteroids for minerals...do we really need more stuff? If so, it would be a job for robotics.

There's so many insurmountable issues in the space conquering fantasy, they aren't worth enumerating.

The question that i'd love to hear from the geniuses is this one:

Should we really go out there, and spread the glory of our species to other planets? Would that be ethical?

Or should we at least prove ourselves worthy first? With this experiment here?

The notion of having to leave the Earth because we've trashed it is the same as having to leave western Europe because we trashed it.
Through our uncanny success and intelligence.

There's even some religious overtones in this 'manifest destiny' we cling to.

I've met a very few people that even vaguely agree with me about this. I think our T.A. may be one of them. And a math geek at JREF (complexity) was one.

We'd really need to find some loop-holes in the laws (of thermodynamics) before our sci-fi vision will become fact.
And, of course, avoid any ethical considerations.
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#4
We need to be able to spread the word of Jesus amongst the stars.
"Who's with me?." - stanky
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#5
Quote:The notion of having to leave the Earth because we've trashed it is the same as having to leave western Europe because we trashed it.

Through our uncanny success and intelligence.

There's even some religious overtones in this 'manifest destiny' we cling to.

I've met a very few people that even vaguely agree with me about this. I think our T.A. may be one of them.

...and me.   you forgot me! Huh Sad
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#6
(03-17-2019, 04:40 PM)stanky Wrote:  Nothing makes me feel more alienated from the human destiny and unstoppable intelligence, than how very many really intelligent people are convinced that we will eventually populate the galaxies. It's hard to find one of our geniuses that doesn't share that opinion.

I've never bought it. Not even a little. Which is evidence of my lack of intelligence.
I very seriously doubt that we'll ever manage a colony on Mars...and if we could manage it, it would be an absurdly costly endeavor with almost no conceivable rewards...other than bragging rights and emotional idiocy.

Even the plan to mine asteroids for minerals...do we really need more stuff? If so, it would be a job for robotics.

There's so many insurmountable issues in the space conquering fantasy, they aren't worth enumerating.

The question that i'd love to hear from the geniuses is this one:

Should we really go out there, and spread the glory of our species to other planets? Would that be ethical?

Or should we at least prove ourselves worthy first? With this experiment here?

The notion of having to leave the Earth because we've trashed it is the same as having to leave western Europe because we trashed it.
Through our uncanny success and intelligence.

There's even some religious overtones in this 'manifest destiny' we cling to.

I've met a very few people that even vaguely agree with me about this. I think our T.A. may be one of them. And a math geek at JREF (complexity) was one.

We'd really need to find some loop-holes in the laws (of thermodynamics) before our sci-fi vision will become fact.
And, of course, avoid any ethical considerations.

Stay here and die then.
You can lead 'em to knowledge, but you can't make 'em think.
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#7
yup. I'd say that's a given.

Di, i could never forget about you...but i didn't want to make assumptions. I don't recall us much discussing the matter. I forget lots of stuff.
Apologies, dearest.

In general, i've found that the skeptical 'community' is mostly pro-space colony thinking. With an understandable bias towards high tech solutions to problems that were enabled with tech.

but i'm no Luddite about this. i'm a cheerleader for all manner of future potential gleaned from our increasing knowledge.
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#8
I just don't see the point of constant expansion of one species to seed the universe with homogeneity.  If there is different lifeforms out there just leave them be.  

That said, the kid in me (stop laughin', there's still a vestige in us all) loves the idea of spacey stuff, we were raised on it, of course it fascinates and excites us.  
 It's only that our more sober moments bring home the reality that it ain't Hollywood out there.

But it's okay to have totally different attitudes to the issue isn't it?  As long as we don't confuse the wishes with the facts?
huh? please?  Blush
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#9
of course.

I too love outer space and the alien planets, and the cool weapons we'll have to win our righteous battles in those very foreign lands.

Our general policy remains the same regarding exploration:

Shoot first; ask questions later.
And don't forget the missionary nature of the mission...to spread freedom and end oppression.

It's unlikely to suspect that our intergalactic politics will be much different than our global politics.

The solace I find in this scenario is that, at our present state of sophistication, we are light years away from having any influence beyond this sphere. The obstacles are scientific in nature.

They just happen to coincide with our ethical retardation.

Any Martians that are lurking on this thread should breathe easy for another day. If you breathe in a way we understand.
(assuming my assessment is valid, of course.)

I love the spirit of the adventure. Whether its the journey to the center of the Earth, or 20,000 fathoms beneath the sea...it's very cool stuff.

It's probably why i'd love to see an expedition below the Antarctic ice cap...even though it would likely be disastorous on every level...including the geo-political.

As things are, we have an international treaty regarding ownership of Antarctica...and that is an amazing thing.

It's also something that almost no one expects will be honored once grand riches are discovered below the surface.

And of course, there are grand riches to be had there.
Just below the grand riches of the pure water that is presently an obstacle to what lies below.

What a grand stash of clean, fresh water we have there...just waiting for America to claim.

(It's our God-given right.)

anyway, that's the next really big adventure, imho.

and one that doesn't require radical violations of the laws of thermodynamics or the problems of space journeys of extraordinary time and distance. And the frail realities of our biology.

I'm amazed, frankly, that we haven't nuked the shit out of that ice cap yet...just to get a glimpse of the promised land way down under.

This slow melt agenda we're on now will simply take too long.


(That's kind-of romantic, right?)
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#10
(03-17-2019, 04:40 PM)stanky Wrote:  Nothing makes me feel more alienated from the human destiny and unstoppable intelligence, than how very many really intelligent people are convinced that we will eventually populate the galaxies. It's hard to find one of our geniuses that doesn't share that opinion.

I think it just goes to show how prone people are to fantasy. They reject god, but as long as there's a mathematical chance of populating the galaxy, they can cling to that belief.

I gave that one up shortly after Santa and Jesus, when I realised how fucking far away Proxima Centauri is.

I can enjoy Star Trek without needing to believe it's a documentary.
Love is... that one person whose freshly-warm toilet seat you don't find disgusting.
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