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The Precipitation Competition thread
#1
We antipodeans will never win a snow fight,  but for the 2nd driest continent on the planet we punch above our weight for rainfall figures sometimes. Confused 

Here's a chart for the math nerds to play with.   How heavy is it raining in Cairns?

http://www.bom.gov.au/products/IDQ60801/IDQ60801.94287.shtml

I did a quick Googly conversion and 6.65 inches over 24 hours seems a lot.  Especially as most of it is coming down in short bursts.

How do you even breathe in rain that heavy??   I've been up there in   normal monsoon rain  it was suffocating.  This is way above normal. 

Meanwhile back at the ranch, well south of Cairns, the drought continues, a few areas got enough to replenish dams but most didn't.  And none got enough to keep new growth grass alive. 
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#2
Update those figures.  "Ex-tropical cyclone Owen has dumped as much as 350 millimetres on the north Queensland coast in 24 hours and could reintensify into a cyclone once again in the Gulf of Carpentaria."

13 inches in 24hrs.  And still coming.  Not bad for an "ex" cyclone.

https://www.smh.com.au/national/queensland/ex-tc-owen-could-reform-after-dumping-350mm-on-queensland-coast-20181210-p50l8p.html?ref=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_source=rss_feed

Good news is that the weather pattern looks likely to drag it southward where the water is needed.  Could be that drought breaker they're looking for.  It will also put those Queensland fires out.

...aaaand there's murmurs that the normal monsoon cycle is likely to return this season.  That would be nice.
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#3
The most I've seen was 9 inches over night.
At the stankerosa, that translated to 6' deep trenches in our road, and cement blocks travelling 100 yards.
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#4
(12-09-2018, 04:55 PM)Di Wundrin Wrote:  I did a quick Googly conversion and 6.65 inches over 24 hours seems a lot. It is, but mild compared to some places.

[quote='Di Wundrin' pid='56686' dateline='1544414973']
13 inches in 24hrs.  And still coming.  Not bad for an "ex" cyclone.

That's a bit more like it.

Have a look at Milford Sound - they average annual rainfall there is 250 inches, and when it rains, it usually pumps in at 10 inches a day. The place is built for it, though. Never floods.

Or you could go to India and cop 500+ inches: https://www.worldatlas.com/articles/the-ten-wettest-places-in-the-world.html

(note Cropp River, in NZ, on that list - 1049mm (41 inches) in two days.

I quite enjoy heavy rain.
Love is... that one person whose freshly-warm toilet seat you don't find disgusting.
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#5
Yeahbut Yeahbut ... 2nd driest continent TA, not a bad effort considering the handicap.

I like it 'awesome' too, but not to where it's lapping the doorstep. That happened in Singleton when the drought there broke. The drains couldn't handle it so I was out 'drowning' in it digging little trenches though the lawn and garden to steer the overflow away from the house.
I'm really not the outdoorsy type so that was a tad more traumatic than planned. [Image: yellow-laughing-smiley-emoticon.gif]
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#6
Locals still talk about this:

Five Years After Hurricane Irene, Vermont Still Striving for Resilience


Quote:Irene was actually only a hurricane for a brief stretch over distant North Carolina. Its winds dwindled once it made landfall. But while winds and storm surge make hurricanes so telegenic, what made this one so destructive was rain. Irene dumped as much as 11 inches of rain on parts of Vermont, and caused $733 million in damage. In all, it checked in at $14.3 billion, the sixth-costliest hurricane in American history.

The rain:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aBPe7YxbQpY

Aftermath:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7dztomuXD0k
"This is what you get when you send your brains on holiday." - TA
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#7
(12-10-2018, 07:17 AM)grayman Wrote:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7dztomuXD0k

Wow, the roads people will have work for years from that little lot.

Flooding events are at record highs. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_floods#2018
Love is... that one person whose freshly-warm toilet seat you don't find disgusting.
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#8
They were running footage of the Cairns area last night and there seems to be surprisingly little damage or flooding.
It depends on how much they got up on the tablelands, maybe it's still coming and hasn't hit the coast yet.

But the tropical areas seem better prepared to cope with heavy rain, practice from the monsoons I suppose.
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#9
The topography of Vermont is what made the Irene floods intense. There was nowhere for the water to spread out.
"This is what you get when you send your brains on holiday." - TA
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#10
absolutely.

same deal in lower Appalachia.

drain pipe ain't big enough, basically.
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