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diet
#1
There is such a flood of contradictory data surrounding the question of what to eat, that the confusion alone is probably causing some ailments.
I have loosely followed the trends, over the years; marveled at how it varies, constantly...mostly suggesting that everything we know is wrong. The sacred food pyramid has changed relentlessly. We've likely known people that were on strange diets that became evangelists for that particular quirk. 
Over the years, we've gained the luxury of being choosy about what we eat. And for every fetishistic decision we make regarding nutrition, there are people that champion it...and others who refute it...with equal vehemence.

I recall an era of promotion for various products that were high in unsaturated fats...like various margarines.
These products have fallen out of favor. The latest trend always manages to sound very scientific. Until it isn't.
When I was a kid, when television came into my world, we were hammered with the need to have four glasses of milk everyday.

That idea was heavily sponsored and subsidized by the dairy industry. Around the same time, various cereals were touted as being part of a nutritious breakfast. It was an easy sell for adults with kids. Kids would gladly eat that bowl of cereal, with its added vitamins.
And you needed the miracle of milk to be added to it.  It made no difference in the good news, if your cereal of choice was half sugar.

Kellog's sugar frosted flakes were part of a complete breakfast. With the addition of milk, with it's added vitamin d, was a sure fire winner.
Plus, it was easy and convenient for the harried housewife of the 50's.

Part of that overwhelming propaganda was the notion the breakfast was the most important meal of the day.
We heard that news relentlessly.
Wonder bread helps build strong bodies 12 ways.

I grew up hearing that.

It wasn't really true.
Although it was relatively true.

Eating crap food is the healthy option to eating no food.

Because i have a lot to say about this subject, I will break this post into bite-sized units.

(stay tuned.) 
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#2
The only horse I have in this race is that I've witnessed absurd levels of contradiction and confusion.
True, I have a personal aversion to confined animal operations because of an innate Bambi-esque aspect in my personality disorder.
Cruelty, in its many forms, is something that has repelled me from the time i was 5 years old.

As I age, i've loosened up a lot as per being a judgmental prick. It's possible that I've simply become lethargic. And apathetic.
I don't much care what people do. I lack the youthful energy to make a stance.
Evangelism of any flavor has become distasteful to me.

That said, I have some opinions. They tend to be influenced by the more recent scientific understanding we have.
For instance, the role of our micro-biomes..
And how they change from place to place. And over time.
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#3
For the most part, humans have been poor. That translates to the old universal diet of our genetic make-up.
We ate whatever we could. We were hungry. That's what we mostly had in common.
It wasn't until much later on that we had the luxury of imposing religious restrictions on our dietary choices.

No shellfish here; no hoofed animals there...and definitely no human flesh. Anywhere.
Even though human flesh was part of a well balanced breakfast at certain times in our long history.
People, eating other people, were the luckiest people in the world.
(Sung to the tune of a famous Barbara Streisand song.)

Because it enabled them to survive. And reproduce.

As repugnant as we find that now, there is a bit of the cannibal in all of us.
The Paleo diet is incomplete without the occasional human flesh.

If we examine the likely diet of our ancestors, which was highly omnivorous, eating pretty much everything we could get our hands on; coupled with regular fasting...imposed by reality rather than anything remotely spiritual, we should also take note of the life spans of these ancestors.
They ate organic, all the way. Fresh; raw...you name it. We evolved hungry.

Now, we have choices. So many choices.
And we have the luxury of eating stuff that doesn't even come from our locale.
This is a relatively new phenomena, should we examine the long march of homo-sapiens.
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#4
"One man's meat is another man's poison" applies.

I've learned the hard way a healthy diet of fruit and grains trigges chaos in my biosystem.

The acid in fruit, and something that I'm clueless about in grains like oats in particular but also barley, act like toxins. Wheat with it's 'evil' gluten has no ill effects. Oats cause me to break out in a rash and mouth ulcers for a week!
What the hell is in oats that isn't in wheat?

The acidic content of fruits seem simple enough, bananas avocados and apples are 'safe' citrus and berries are 'poison'.

We seem to be getting some confusing results in our evolution regarding metabolisms. You'd think we're a great enough mix of DNA to be able to eat the same stuff with the same results wouldn't you??
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