Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
sleep
#1
Mathew Walker ( a neuro-scientist that studies sleep) has some very interesting things to report on the role of sleep and how our brains work. The stats from the research are rather stunning....stuff you don't often hear.
For instance, in the matter of fatal car wrecks, sleep deprivation is more deadly than drug and alcohol intoxication.
Inadequate sleep correlates strongly with obesity (which is counter intuitive, i suppose) and cancer, and especially Alzheimer's.

I suck at sleep, which makes this flood of data extra compelling.

Some of the very compelling data suggests delegitimizing certain sacred cows.
For instance, waking kids for early school. That does society at large no favors.
Experiments (and a few national policies) that address this, show almost immediate increases in test scores and all manner of other improvements.

Our fetish with forcing medical interns to endure absurdly long shifts correlates strongly to increased likelihood of errors that contribute to the death of patients. In fact, as per the stats, should you need a surgery, the pertinent question you should ask the surgeon is "How much sleep did you get last night.

Here's a kicker:
The ridiculous tradition of daylight's saving time, which twice a year, alters the sleep patterns of people that are enslaved to the clock, demonstrates a 24% increase in heart attacks when the hour is lost; and a corresponding opposite effect when the hour is gained.

I'll try to link something appropriate.
Meanwhile, for the interested, give the guy a google.

Fascinating information.

(I wallow in science stuff, btw, so I'm not easily fascinated. Presently i'm digesting a new book about graphene. It's called "Graphene", if you're curious about that stuff.)

The role of sleep in our lives is mind-boggling to me. The data coming in from very many studies; some that are 20 years long, is some almost shockingly relevant data that we would be well advised to be aware of.

There's a social tendency to take pride in needing very little sleep. I'm one of those guys; rarely get 6 hours. hence, what I'm learning about this runs in the face of that  which may have been a positive in my delusional self-esteem system. For that reason alone, I suspect I've been missing something. In other words, here's a rare case of a person well set in his ways and beliefs that is coming forth to admit how wrong he has been.

(How often does that happen?)
Reply
#2
Given a perfect world where I didn't have to punch the clock as it were, I'd naturally gravitate to about 6 hours at night and then a 2 hour afternoon nap.
You can lead 'em to knowledge, but you can't make 'em think.
Reply
#3
Funny you mention that.
According to Walker's research, that scenario is inferior to the 8 hour unit at night.

(I never manage 8 hours, much less the 2 hour nap. And I don't even punch the clock.)

I love sleep. It's precious to me.
According to the brain study stuff, sleep is when our brains repair all the damage from wakefulness.

What takes place during dreams, according to studies done from the awake place of science,with wires and meters and all, is very surprising stuff. It also speaks to the mechanisms of memory storage.

The chemistry of all that is amazing.

We're mostly along for the ride. Not so much calling the shots. Like driving a car with no understanding of the combustion cycle.
Yet, we invented the car.
Or brain, otoh, is a complete stranger to us.

In fact, what is this 'us'?
We have some sense of it; we mostly avoid the examination of the details. It's largely ephemeral, which is offensive to our materialistic proclivities. The 'self' is imaginary. And real. Or the universe is imaginary. And real.

Mostly, we are disinclined to ponder that which we are. Or aren't.

I now suspect that my problem has been sleep deprivation, all along.
Reply
#4
Living Without Artificial Light


Quote:Linda Geddes decided to live for weeks in only candlelight – no bulbs, no screens. Along the way, she discovered simple things that everyone can try to sleep and feel better.
"when you think you've lost everything... you find out you can always lose a little bit more." - President Bush
Reply
#5
(04-25-2018, 02:59 PM)stanky Wrote:  I suck at sleep, which makes this flood of data extra compelling.

Join the club. If I had three wishes, one of 'em would definitely be getting a decent sleep. I don't get more than four in a row, except in rare circumstances.

Unfortunately, I realise this is extremely bad, but there aren't any answers available, so I live in a state of perpetual exhaustion.

C'est la vie.
Love is... that one person whose freshly-warm toilet seat you don't find disgusting.
Reply
#6
(04-28-2018, 01:01 PM)The Atheist Wrote:  
(04-25-2018, 02:59 PM)stanky Wrote:  I suck at sleep, which makes this flood of data extra compelling.

Join the club. If I had three wishes, one of 'em would definitely be getting a decent sleep. I don't get more than four in a row, except in rare circumstances.

Unfortunately, I realise this is extremely bad, but there aren't any answers available, so I live in a state of perpetual exhaustion.

C'est la vie.

Me too lately. I got a whole 2 hours straight last night.
I just live off the 'nod offs' through the day.

But shift work wrecked any kind of sleeping pattern anyway so I roll with the flow.
Reply
#7
(04-28-2018, 03:27 PM)Di Wundrin Wrote:  But shift work wrecked any kind of sleeping pattern anyway so I roll with the flow.

I decided to find out some facts about rotating shifts when a company I was dealing with asked me to find people. It seemed to me to be an insane idea - changing shifts three times every 23 days.

I fund out fairly quickly that short of driving at 150 mph while drunk, stuffing down deep-fried burgers and smoking crack-laced cigarettes, it's the worst thing you can do to yourself. It destroys your family life, brain and pretty well everything else. Money' great, though.

I turned them down and let someone else find the people. Having learned what I had I would have considered it my duty to tell applicants what they were getting into.
Love is... that one person whose freshly-warm toilet seat you don't find disgusting.
Reply
#8
Quote:I decided to find out some facts about rotating shifts when a company I was dealing with asked me to find people. It seemed to me to be an insane idea - changing shifts three times every 23 days.

Maaaaate!  I did rotating shifts for 26 years, and while the rosters tried to string a few days together of the one start time it was only night shift that ever had 7 days of the same start time.

It was based on a fortnight and no two were the same, and was utter chaos to the uninitiated.  It had 'double backs' that were treated as RDOs
Finish 6 am then rostered on the next day but the 6am finish day was 'officially' a day off. 

It was framed up on the wall, all the fortnights one under the other so we could plot and plan our future shifts.

The reason for it being like that was to ensure that everyone got roughly equal penalty rate time over the fortnight or month.  It prevented bitching but wouldn't have gotten past the health and safety nazis these days.

We were free to swap the shifts so if anyone wanted a social life they only had to swap with someone (like me) who would gladly take their Saturday nighter in trade for a leaner weekday shift.   The RDOs on weekends were prime trading currency and we 'old hands' held out for the best offers on them from the Party people on staff.

They used to laugh that we were missing out on the fun but when we were well enough set up to afford to apply for  redundancy and retire early they were still looking at another 15 years of working.  They're probably living in trailer parks now.

Just had a funny thought.  We all kept a copy of the full year roster at home with all the swaps inked in.
But we carried a copy of a month's or more (I carried a 6 month copy)  worth of it with us at all times.

It was the equivalent of todays smart phone calendar in a way.  Every appointment or invitation was checked against the roster.  We'd drag the tattered bit of paper out of handbags and pockets and study it diligently before committing to anything.
It ruled our bloody lives.   But somehow that seemed to be how it should operate.

It's not for everyone, they're born not made.  I shouldn't have made that comment about shiftwork wrecking my sleep patterns, I don't really blame it, it's more an excuse than a reason, I think I always had fucked up sleep patterns.

I thought I'd died and gone to heaven when I transferred to shiftwork I kicked myself I didn't do it sooner.


2 qualifications to look for in picking a born shiftworker TA.
 Flexible (or fucked up) body clock, and utter dedication to Mammon.  

Simple enough? ...  should be still able to find a few of us around, but the tightening on penalty rates is sure taking the fun out of it for people doing it now.  Sad



Perfect fit for me.  Sure there were times when I was a hospital case from too much overtime, but the normal shifts had no detrimental affects.  
I get bored easily.  Turning up at work the same time every day drove me batshit.  

I never worked a 9 to 5 job, the only job I had before finding shifts was 10.59am start and 5.59pm finish.
That was so they didn't have to pay us the 6pm afternoon penalty rate.  But it was only a 35 hour week too so didn't pay royally.   The telegraph office had 8 hour shifts, no breaks,  all of which, except the 6 7 8 am weekday starts were paid at penalty rates.
Yeeee bloody haaaa.

The reason I worked with so many people over the years is because there was only ever a core group of long term staff.
Only around 6 or 7 of us out of a staff of 26 could hack the distance.

We didn't adapt to it, it fitted us.

I did it for 17 years there, then another 9 on similar shifts, and work,  on computers when technology called for me to bail out to another cash happy penalty shift tenure.

Some people only lasted a couple of weeks, it took 6 weeks to train them so that was a bummer.
We got to where we could pick the stayers from the quitters by their yawn rates, and put the appropriate training effort in according to the likelihood of having to be still working with them down the track.
 
It was kind of cruel but when a noobie turned up everyone vanished because training was a pain in the arse.
 
So we made a pact that whoever had a night shift coming up within 2 weeks of their starting time would take them.
They had to work the same shifts as the 'trainers' so that night shift sorted them out pretty damned quick.
Saved us wasting effort on 'quitters'.

I was never a morning person, still not nor ever will be.  My parents wanted to drown me for playing with my toys and warbling, and rattling the cot at 2am.  I'd be wide awake until dawn then collapse in a heap and couldn't be woken to be fed until at least 9am.   Mum said I drove them mad.  I can see why.


Also see why shiftwork was invented for me.   I swapped away all my morning shifts a year in advance.  Even if the person I'd swapped had snatched their time by then it was still official as we signed slips which were filed so no shift went uncovered.   Had it nailed!  

The money was phenomenal, doubled my salary on penalty rates some years and it allowed me to retire comfortably at 48.   I earned it hard in one way, in loss of social life, but I wasn't into partying and no family considerations so not as big a deal as it would be to most. 
It was how I wanted to 'organise' my days   so it was a win/win. 
 I wouldn't have been any healthier doing office hours and probably would have been knuckle dragging insane with boredom by then.

Could have gone postal! Confused

The studies that are done make me wonder if they are looking at shiftworkers arse backwards a bit.
I can see how it would knock around those forced to do it when they're unsuited to it,  but do they also study those who thrive on it? 
That long term core group were the ones with least (genuine) sick leave taken.  We took the odd dodgy one if there was an emergency but overall we were the healthiest ones there.
Reply
#9
(04-28-2018, 08:04 PM)Di Wundrin Wrote:  The studies that are done make me wonder if they are looking at shiftworkers arse backwards a bit.
I can see how it would knock around those forced to do it when they're unsuited to it,  but do they also study those who thrive on it? 
That long term core group were the ones with least (genuine) sick leave taken.  We took the odd dodgy one if there was an emergency but overall we were the healthiest ones there.

Yeah, there probably are people who suit the lifestyle, but they're few & far between. The dumbest thing is, accident & injury rates are higher on rotating shifts.

You're also dead right that the money's good and that's why people take it on.
Love is... that one person whose freshly-warm toilet seat you don't find disgusting.
Reply
#10
I was the queen of the late afternoon shift. They were the ones I booked a year ahead. We 1 2 and 3 pm starts.

Think about it. All day free until 3pm. Turn up, work an hour then the freight train curfew cut in to free up the tracks for the peak hour passenger trains.
So from 4pm all the trains we had to track were coalies and freight in transit that we didn't have to deal with until it stopped somewhere. We'd think about what to get for tea, catch up on the goss and be fed and ready for the onslaught at 6pm when the freight started out from the Sydney yards.

It'd be fast and furious until about 8pm then trickle off to easy. We'd do a check of the managers offices and as soon as their lights were out we'd drag out the TV we had stashed and watch that while we worked.

The next big surge came about 11pm but we were clocking off by then and that was the night shift's problem.

Go home, get a normal night's sleep and do it all again tomorrow. All on penalty rates. sooooo gooood.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)