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stanky's extreme engineering dumping ground:
The Hobart publicans will be seriously cranky about it. [Image: yellow-laughing-smiley-emoticon.gif]
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School of rocks aims to train new generation of dry stone wallers

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"The moose defies domestication."
~ stanky
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Well, I have to approve the initiative, not just for Stanky but for Granddad's stone mason DNA.

I was watching a pommy show the other night and there were miles of those walls all around the joint, even along the roadsides. All could think about was the toll of dead motorcyclists.
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They're what claims most of the enormous number of lives at the Isle of Man TT. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isle_of_Man_TT#Safety

I love motorbikes and motorbike racing, but that course is outright insanity.

40 years ago I bloke was pit-crew for went over to UK and crashed into a wall. Survived minus a lung and an arm.

Give me a nice run-off and hay bales every time.
Love is... that one person whose freshly-warm toilet seat you don't find disgusting.
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Even the hay bales can cause some damage, saw one of those "10 most .." things the other night and a bloke's leg was dangling by a tendon after hitting the bales at the wrong angle.
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Shit yes, they're not marshmallow - I've lifted enough of the fuckers in my time to know.

But infinitely preferably to rock walls.
Love is... that one person whose freshly-warm toilet seat you don't find disgusting.
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Dance party.

https://twitter.com/EvanKirstel/status/1344089363630710786
"The moose defies domestication."
~ stanky
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Nice car.

https://twitter.com/RexChapman/status/1344059878126596098
"The moose defies domestication."
~ stanky
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(12-24-2020, 03:40 PM)grayman Wrote:  School of rocks aims to train new generation of dry stone wallers

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I admire a well stacked pile of rubble stone. I understand the craft as well as anyone alive today. Which is why I tend to balk at the mystique of it. One thing is certain: It is not an art. It is a craft. Not only that, dry-laid rubble is the very bottom level of the craft.
Not only can almost anyone do it, history has proven that, all over the planet. Craftsmen didn't build all those walls that dot the landscape, in New England and Scotland or even in Lexington, KY. Farmers and peasants did it...to get the rocks from the fields, and make crude barriers to keep the sheep in.

I'm familiar with several groups that exploit the mystique. I've contacted them. There's a big one in Vermont; one in Lexington (The dry wall conservancy, iirc) and for some money, they will teach people how to do this most simple of things that's ever been done.
They always have nearly ideal rocks. The businesses never get back to me, of course.
I could teach (and have) show someone to reach that skill level in a day.

The art of it, is finding a chump to do the relentless heavy lifting. It's a pure grunt sport. Part of it is gathering the gross tonnage. At these 'camps', that part's been taken care off.
Nothing is learned bout cutting stone; the use of mortar; the need for foundations; drainage...or dealing with high temperatures, as in fireplaces. A dry stone wall is often used for terracing, or as a retainment wall to hold back earth above. At least those stone walls need to be thick enough, and sound enough, to hold back tons of dirt. What is being offered at these places is the absolutely bottom level of the craft. That's fine, I guess. But it's not how they advertise it. That kind-of irks me.
It's like if I had a school for advanced wood-working, claiming myself to be a master craftsman, and I showed you how to nail a few 2x4's together.
And offered a degree in it.
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Not surprisingly, I'm very opinionated on the subject. Sorry about that.
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