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Did a Danish entrepreneur sink his homemade submarine with a journalist aboard?
#1
Best headline of the week. 

Quote:Peter Madsen, 46, was rescued after his DIY submarine, the UC3 Nautilus, sank off Copenhagen at about midnight last Thursday.

Swedish journalist Kim Wall, 30, was on the submarine just before it sank and has not been seen since. Madsen said he dropped her off before the sinking, but he's facing a manslaughter charge as investigators search for her body.
The story is a big deal in both affected countries: It has been the lead story, or featured prominently, on news websites including Denmark's main English-language newspaper the Copenhagen Post, and Sweden's largest newspaper, Helsingborgs Dagblad — not to mention the international coverage.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-08-14/peter-madsen-engineer-submarine-builder-manslaughter-charge/8803156

Oops.
"Nobody should pin their hopes on a miracle": Vladimir Putin
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#2
Hell yes, there's a novel twist on making a journalist disappear.
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#3
did you know that drug smugglers use submarines?
How cool is that.

I always wished i could breathe underwater. I liked Aquaman, even if he was the lamest super hero.

(Like being underwater.)
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#4
20,000 Leagues Under The Sea is still a favorite book and movie (The Disney version...). The guy who built the drug smuggling subs (although there may have been more than just one) earned the name 'Captain Nemo'.

Ever scuba stank? Closest thing to it mere humans can get.
You can lead 'em to knowledge, but you can't make 'em think.
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#5
Nope.
Plenty of snorkeling, though. In my jock prime, i could hold my breath for a long time...and dive fairly deep.

if we could ever resolve our philosophical differences, i'd hope you'd teach me.
I think you' fine me more fun in the ocean than here.
I can't hide my exuberant awe and wonder for the natural world.
I got a serious jones for it, dude.
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#6
I can't teach you. Scuba instructors must be certified to teach, and although I'm certified to dive, I'm not certified to teach. Sorry.
You can lead 'em to knowledge, but you can't make 'em think.
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#7
(08-14-2017, 11:38 PM)sparks Wrote:  20,000 Leagues Under The Sea is still a favorite book and movie (The Disney version...).

I can't ever think of Nemo without seeing James Mason's face.

(08-14-2017, 11:38 PM)sparks Wrote:  Ever scuba stank?  Closest thing to it mere humans can get.

Diving is a bit like drugs - it gives you a different perception on the world. When you're 100 feet down, it's painfully obvious that you're in a hostile alien environment and all the achievements and smarts of the entire human race won't help you a bit if you fuck up.
Love is... that one person whose freshly-warm toilet seat you don't find disgusting.
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#8
You guys piss me off.

(I hate it when I envy people.)

shit, even ol' BSB was a diver.

Sparky? You're no spring chicken, right?

Do you still get out there?

I'm all ears (you too, T.A.) if you feel like sharing some tales of your dives.
(Mine were limited by my need to come up for air, which isn't a big issue on most coral reefs. One needn't go very deep to witness the wonders.)

I can't imagine why i never managed to get certified for scuba. It's a massive hole in my life. May have been connected to money, or its chronic rarity. But I was way into swimming and exploring under water. Jock swimmer; life guard; all that shit.

I've done a bit of free diving into submerged caverns...and that's some freaky shit. Glad i wasn't scuba trained for that shit.
Quite possibly the most dangerous 'sport' there is.
I'm confident that had i been scuba-ready, I would have been lured to an early grave in that game.

Who doesn't want to see what lies around that next corner, right?
I was the precise type of idiot that often dies in cave diving.

(Grissly way to go. I've been to some submerged caverns wherein more than 60 certified cave divers have perished. How insane is that? They even knew better.)
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#9
No, not a spring chicken here:  next lap around the sun will show me to be 60.  But yea, I still get out several times a year.  Really ought to go more often, like all things, it's easier if you keep after it regularly.  Never did any daredevil shit like cave diving.  But lots of pretty robust open water diving off the coast of the Pacific Northwest where I live.  You generally have a water temp of 55 to 58 F and visibility can range from just a few feet on a shitty day to 25 or more on clear days. I enjoy chasing down Dungeness  crab:  They can really move when they know you're gonna turn 'em into a cocktail.  And there's nothing like fresh sea scallops wrapped in prosciutto hot off the BBQ with hollandaise sauce on the side.

Sorry, I don't have any photos.  Used to like to do that back before digital cameras and none of my stuff on 'analog' film has been transferred  to digital.

But rest assured, if you can still swim a little bit, you can scuba.  It's definitely worth the effort.
You can lead 'em to knowledge, but you can't make 'em think.
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#10
I haven't been for 20 years or so, but used to dive regularly. The places worth diving are fairly hard to get to and I just lost the inclination. Once you've hand-fed fish and done a wreck dive or two, the need to go and do it all again fades.

Best place ever for me is White Island, an active volcano off the North Island coast. Being active, the water around it for about 1 km is much warmer than the rest of the sea and it's like a tropical dive, with fish & plants you don't get elsewhere in NZ.

I'll still snorkel now and then, but that's about as far as it goes. If you get a chance, you should take it, but if you're a 60+ smoker, I doubt your lungs would be fit for it. For absolutely certain, check with your Dr first.
Love is... that one person whose freshly-warm toilet seat you don't find disgusting.
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