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comprehending economics?
#11
Read a review of this book. Seems like it may be an interesting read.

The Once and Future Worker
I wonder why people mostly suck at having fun?- stanky
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#12
Interesting alright - this bit at the start rings true in NZ as well:

The American worker is in crisis. Wages have stagnated for more than a generation. Reliance on welfare programs has surged. Life expectancy is falling as substance abuse and obesity rates climb.

I might have to order a copy.
Love is... that one person whose freshly-warm toilet seat you don't find disgusting.
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#13
I read it too. (The review.)

If you get a hold of it, will you do a book report here?
I'm curious, but i find the endorsers a bit troubling.

I should try to think in baby steps, but my suspicion is that we'll eventually need to embrace the dignity of noting having to work much at all.
There's not much dignity to be had in merely looking busy; or worse, doing harmful work, even if it manages to bring home the bacon.

I'd guess that as we become more aware of what is actually being done, and assess its value rationally, we'll need to drastically change the way societies function. Of course there ar plenty of people that do essential work, and they should feel good about it and be rewarded for the effort.
(You fall into that category, for instance.)
But as one looks around, there's lots of pointless activity taking place, under the Rubicon of work.
Add to that the inevitable march of automation; coupled with a move away from vapid consumption and growing concern for the bio-sphere, and we may have to rethink the nature of work itself, and question the innate righteousness of it.

Work is a science term. Job is something else.

Are we allowed to say that most jobs suck? That the world would be in better shape if they weren't done?

Can we fathom a way to divorce work from money? Or do we need to invent new ways to remain employed, just to keep currencies moving?

There are a few books that discuss this dilemma. They tend to look at things as if there could be a future. Even though a machine will likely be driving that train...and the contents of what i being moved to and fro, and why, will come under greater scrutiny.

I don't think we're emotionally open to the possibility of life without toil and tedium. Our well being is connected to the degree of which we sacrifice and suffer. There's the pride of the coal miner; the heroism of the soldier...both threatened by the prospect of abandoning fossil fuel combustion and global hostilities. We don't really want to embrace the potential good news of curing cancer, for instance.

There would be massive lay-offs if we get our shit together.
We tip-toe around this stuff.
Universal health care would be great, unless you're in the insurance industry.

Examples of my point are nearly endless.
And we continue to dodge the underlying paradox.

Oddly enough, I suspect that it's much more comfy to assume that the future is fucked, and continue to act busy. bring home a check. Bide the time until Jesus comes back as an asteroid; whatever; as long as it spares us the task of examining the situation we face.

Civilization at large is a lot like a suicidal person, considering that final act. They're too far gone to imagine turning it around. It's easier to assume an inevitable collapse or war or plague or rapture.

We mostly don't have the stomach for imagining heaven on Earth.

What then? Play the harp?

Armageddon is a much more digestible fantasy. And very achievable.

Realistic, even.
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#14
Even in science fiction, the only way we can cope with a Utopian society is to discover its evil underpinnings.
To see society of happy well adjusted humans having a fun life is like asking the question of uncovering the evil overlord's insidious agenda.

We can't write the book that dos the follow up on "And then, they lived happily ever after." The end.

Religion helps us dodge the problem. We simply postpone glory until after death. Therefore, activities here are pre-fucked, and at best can only offer the good life later. After you're dead.

Most monkeys and apes spend obscene amounts of effort at making life suck. They live in a state of perpetual warfare, basically...interrupted by brief moments of rape-like sex. We're in that same boat. Like the baboons, we aren't up for an intelligent approach to reproduction.

Even among humans, such talk is pretty much off limits. We're in a tight little groove, us humans.

Here's a radically offensive thing to say:

If the human life span averaged 30 years, like most other large mammals, we wouldn't be in this mess.

We're greedy for life, but insist that it be fairly shitty.

In other news, the Chinese have the first Crisper altered babies. Genetically manipulated for aids immunity.
That sort of hanky panky is illegal everywhere else. Too much like playing God. Nukes, evidently, are the 'just right' amount of playing God.

Also, a new probe has successfully landed on Mars. Long drive to get there, but pretty exciting stuff. I look forward to the information we may receive from the endeavor. Elon Musk says he wants to live there, even if he dies in the attempt.

That's kind of how I feel about the Earth and it's future.

Not much to lose, making bold proclamations.

Here's a scenario you won't see:

"Little Johnny? What do you want to be when you grow up?"

"Gosh, Mr. Johnson...I've been thinking about that a lot. i think I'd like to flunk out of high school; get a girl pregnant; try to steal a car; get caught; go to jail for a few years; get out and sell drugs; party a lot, and eventually o.d. on heroin laced with fentanyl. I'm hoping to accomplish all that by the time I'm thirty."

"Ambitious plan, Johnny...but I believe in you. If you set your mind to it, you can accomplish your goals."


In my next life, I plan to be the new Kim Kardashian. Except for fucking Kayne. That's out.


Shucks, never too late or too soon to map out one's future.
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#15
(11-26-2018, 06:58 PM)stanky Wrote:  "Gosh, Mr. Johnson...I've been thinking about that a lot. i think I'd like to flunk out of high school; get a girl pregnant; try to steal a car; get caught; go to jail for a few years; get out and sell drugs; party a lot, and eventually o.d. on heroin laced with fentanyl. I'm hoping to accomplish all that by the time I'm thirty."

My goal at school was to leave and become a full-time bank/payroll robber.

My dad used to be the organiser of the forest workers' pay, and each Christmas, a Cessna carrying over $1,000,000 flew in to deliver it to him to hand out to the workers. That was a lot of money in those days and I had it pegged to the nearest second how to heist the lot.

I also had a plan to take the Christmas takings from the main horse racing meeting, which would have netted another couple of million.

The only problem, as a 15-year-old boy, was figuring out how I could find people to trust, since I would have required accomplices.

I woulda been great at it.
Love is... that one person whose freshly-warm toilet seat you don't find disgusting.
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#16
I love to plan bank robberies.
Not for the money; for the adventure and the intense puzzle to solve.

Because of my history with cars, my bank robbery plan includes the get away car not starting.
Part two of the fantasy is breaking out of prison. That's an equally romantic puzzle. I admire the depth of planning and the patience and complexity. There's something heroic about it, even though they're not good people.

In the movie versions, the team required is often the weak spot. Even when the bank job goes off flawlessly, the boss is likely to kill the other guys and take all the money. I've seen that a lot.

I think I too would have made an excellent bank robber. Except, I've never much lusted for money or the stuff it buys.
Sure, I could have given it away. Or at least give the plan away. Now I'm too lazy.
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#17
Never held ambitions to rob banks. But I planned a few murders in my school years, does that count?
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#18
(11-27-2018, 04:11 PM)stanky Wrote:  Part two of the fantasy is breaking out of prison.

Mine never got to that. I was always getting away scot-free and the pigs having no clue how it happened.

(11-27-2018, 04:19 PM)Di Wundrin Wrote:  Never held ambitions to rob banks.  But I planned a few murders in my school years, does that count?

Perfectly fine - I still have one of those lists.

Quite a few people have lent a hand by dying in the meantime.
Love is... that one person whose freshly-warm toilet seat you don't find disgusting.
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