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Intergalactic relations??
#11
Di,

If you were any smarter, you do realize you'd never converse with the likes of me, right?

You are the perfect degree of dumb-ass.

(And it's why you're my cyber domintrix bitch love, love.)

Please don't get any smarter. I would become lonely.
And Mary we become overly burdened.

(She's a huge fan of our illicit relationship.)

can you imagine being her?
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#12
No, unfortunately I'm not wired like Mary, wish I was but I'm way more control freak than she is and  less adventurous and open to going with the flow of life.  I'm improving, at least I'm looking for new and different types of   thinking and people on the internet if not in real life.  It's been a buzz really, pity I hadn't tried it decades ago but .. ce la vie.

Not smart Stanky, just curious and cynical. siiiigh.

Thought of another question about those stars.   It says they're short lived.  Then it mentions that they haven't had time to reach those speeds within this galaxy.  

So .. how many parsecs away is the Large Magellenic Cloud??  Further than the centre of the Milky Way to where they are now I'd have guessed.   Wouldn't they be at least fading if they'd traveled that distance and time??


Quote:The Milky Way is a barred spiral galaxy with a diameter between 100,000[sup][30][/sup] and 180,000 light-years.[3

So .. the radial distance would be 50 to  60 thousand light years, and they didn't have time to acquire their 'anamolous' traits over that distance.  


Quote:The Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is a satellite dwarf galaxy of the Milky Way that is among the closest galaxies to Earth. At about 163,000 light-years from Earth, the dwarf galaxy looks like a faint cloud in Southern Hemisphere skies. It lies on the border of the constellations Dorado and Mensa.Apr 11, 2014
Now that says "from Earth" not from the edge of the Milky way so deduct a few thousand LYs?
... but still, they had time to travel at least twice as far and retain the 'anamolies' 


Quote:
But these type of stars only last a few hundred million years
and this would not be enough time for them to reach the speeds needed to travel so far out from our galaxy's centre.

 .. how many is 'a few'?  You lads will have to do the maths but I'm guessing they didn't travel at the speed of light between the 'Cloud' and the Milky Way,  and covering 163,000 light years would take a lot longer than 'a few hundred million years'  even in their 'speedy' case ..  wouldn't it?

So why are they still 'youngish' stars??

No, I haven't overlooked that the gravity of our galaxy may have actually slowed them down a bit, but .03% of C now is slowed down from what?   Certainly not a lot more than .3% of C originally. 
I'm not even going to attempt to do the math on how long it takes to cover 163,000 light years at even .5% of C
even if the galactic speeds of approach are included.  
I read that firing a canon from a moving train thing, but seriously??  How much would that impetus reduce traveling time?  Enough to account for their current levels of energy?

'Splain it to me cos it doesn't add up to me.
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#13
here's one way of 'splaining it' to you, darl:

we can't explain the vast majority of the evidence.

(We tend to forget that.)

I can give it a stab, on a fantastic level.
Probably way wrong...

but wtf...

when we can't explain the vast majority of the evidence, guys like me may sound more credible.

(If I could only remember what it is I believe.)

we don't know shit bout Shinola.

I'm oddly ok with that.

We really don't know much of anything.

I'm not sure why we're compelled to claim otherwise.
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#14
I know lots about Shinola. (they make really wanky bicycles)

http://www.gq.com/story/shinola-ftc-rulling-made-in-detroit-problem
"Nobody should pin their hopes on a miracle": Vladimir Putin
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#15
Shows you can sell anything to people who want to pretend that they're patriotic. Like drunken bogans who wear Aussie flags but don't know how many stars are on it.
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#16
(07-07-2017, 12:44 AM)Shiner Wrote:  I know lots about Shinola. (they make really wanky bicycles)

http://www.gq.com/story/shinola-ftc-rulling-made-in-detroit-problem

holy shit, Shinerola!

I only knew about the shoe polish. And they quit in 1960. wtf

(Tells you how often I polish shoes.)

Surprised I didn't know about the wanky bikes, though. I thought I knew a lot about bikes. Turns out, I don't know shit.

Oh wait...i do know some shit about shit.

fuck. I should quit while i'm a behind.


never liked watches or even watching time...but my dad had a collection of antique gold pocket watches. We sent them to auction when he corked-off. Pity, in a way. He loved those fucking things; did repairs on them; had all the tools, including a sweet gem scope.

oh well...

at least Titanic Brass Polish is still made in America.
You can polish a watch or a show or a bike with the stuff.
Brewing up a batch in the shack out back today.

(Dividend checks go out today!) 
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#17
[Image: 51fa4264bf8a5f10376dccb6ae44657c.png]
"Nobody should pin their hopes on a miracle": Vladimir Putin
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#18
yeah, man.

I have a bike in my basement I can't even ride anymore, and it cost more than any car or truck I've ever owned.
($2,500) which is actually nothing thee days. A really 'good' bicycle will set you back $8,000 or more.

It sits there, tormenting me. I'd like to sell it, but I'm no where near any market. I'd even give it away to the right person.

(Giving a nice bike to anyone other than a bike nut, or even lending it to them, is a guaranteed fucked up bike. Same with guitars...or, I guess anything of quality.)

I don't want to be attached to anything anymore...but I also don't want to to toss nice things into the river.

I have a 100 year old framing hammer, hand forged, with a hand carved hickory handle. I got it from a 100 year old carpenter before he died. It's kind-of precious...so much so, that I never use it.

I hate this.

Yet, I don't quite know what to do about it.

You don't really want to give a hammer like that to some young 'production' carpenter, building McMansions of ticky tack.

It's not that I'm stingy.
Some kid would love to have my $2,500 bike...but he'd trash it on day one. To him, it would be the same as a $59 Walmart discount piece of crap. he'd leave it out in the rain. His dad would eventually run over it in the drive way...and when they took t to the dump, they wouldn't have the sense to retrieve the quality parts.

Why am i doing this totally off-topic rant?

(I gots issues.)
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#19
I get it Stanky. I got that kind of 'baggage' too. Stuff that should be treasured as family heirlooms even though intrinsically they're junk. But 'family' doesn't meant much to people these days. They don't care about the history of some object so I guess it then really is just junk.
I still use a rolling pin, and table spoon which belonged to my Great grandmothers! I would never part with those.

But I understand about giving things to people with no appreciation of their specialness. Philistines right?
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#20
when we're dead, yuppies will be tossing that stuff into a rental dumpster.

When I was working in D.C., crack was huge. Everyday, someone would try to sell me something; it was always $20. (They weren't trying to sell me crack, btw...they were trying to sell whatever they just stole so's they could buy crack.

One day, a young junkie is pushing a $5,000 bicycle down the road. He had no idea what he had there. Tried to sell it to me for $20.
(Everything was $20) I couldn't bear to buy it, or report him. It was a confusing moment. Hopefully, someone ended up with a sweet bike...and someone scored a rock.

Another time, a fried junkie hustler wanted to sell me a super sweet, almost new laser level and transit...something i could have used and loved. It was a 3 grand tool; no doubt he's snatched it off a contractor's truck. Could have been mine for the usual $20.
(I jokingly asked him if he'd take a check.)

couldn't buy it, though.

Hopefully, it ended up in hands that knew what it was.

I should get over these last shards of morality that poke me in the neck.

Fact is, crime is now the world's largest enterprise.

(If you count illegal war crimes and such.)
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